Previous Page of 58Next Page

Peter Pan

spinner.gif

This edition of Peter Pan has been created in the United States of America from a comparison of various editions determined by age to be in the Public Domain in the United States. There are questions concerning the copyright status in other countries, particularly in members or former members of the British Commonwealth. Anyone who can contribute information as to the copyrights status of earliest editions is encouraged to do so. For the present, this edition of Peter Pan is restricted to the United States, and is not to be for use or included in any storage or retrieval system in any country, other than the United States of America.

To assist in the preservation of this edition in proper usage, our edition is claimed as copyright (c)1991 due to our preparations of several sources, our own research, and the inclusions of additions and explanations to the original sources.

Disclaimer: All persons concerned disclaim any and all reponsibility that this etext is perfectly accurate. No pretenses in any manner are made that this text should be thought of as an authoritative edition in any respect.

PETER PAN [PETER AND WENDY] BY J. M. BARRIE [James Matthew Barrie]

A Millennium Fulcrum Edition (c)1991 by Duncan Research

Contents ---------

Chapter 1 PETER BREAKS THROUGH

Chapter 2 THE SHADOW

Chapter 3 COME AWAY, COME AWAY!

Chapter 4 THE FLIGHT

Chapter 5 THE ISLAND COME TRUE

Chapter 6 THE LITTLE HOUSE

Chapter 7 THE HOME UNDER THE GROUND

Chapter 8 THE MERMAID'S LAGOON

Chapter 9 THE NEVER BIRD

Chapter 10 THE HAPPY HOME

Chapter 11 WENDY'S STORY

Chapter 12 THE CHILDREN ARE CARRIED OFF

Chapter 13 DO YOU BELIEVE IN FAIRIES?

Chapter 14 THE PIRATE SHIP

Chapter 15 "HOOK OR ME THIS TIME"

Chapter 16 THE RETURN HOME

Chapter 17 WHEN WENDY GREW UP

Chapter 1

PETER BREAKS THROUGH

All children, except one, grow up. They soon know that they will grow up, and the way Wendy knew was this. One day when she was two years old she was playing in a garden, and she plucked another flower and ran with it to her mother. I suppose she must have looked rather delightful, for Mrs. Darling put her hand to her heart and cried, "Oh, why can't you remain like this for ever!" This was all that passed between them on the subject, but henceforth Wendy knew that she must grow up. You always know after you are two. Two is the beginning of the end.

Of course they lived at 14 [their house number on their street], and until Wendy came her mother was the chief one. She was a lovely lady, with a romantic mind and such a sweet mocking mouth. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other, that come from the puzzling East, however many you discover there is always one more; and her sweet mocking mouth had one kiss on it that Wendy could never get, though there it was, perfectly conspicuous in the right-hand corner.

The way Mr. Darling won her was this: the many gentlemen who had been boys when she was a girl discovered simultaneously that they loved her, and they all ran to her house to propose to her except Mr. Darling, who took a cab and nipped in first, and so he got her. He got all of her, except the innermost box and the kiss. He never knew about the box, and in time he gave up trying for the kiss. Wendy thought Napoleon could have got it, but I can picture him trying, and then going off in a passion, slamming the door.

Mr. Darling used to boast to Wendy that her mother not only loved him but respected him. He was one of those deep ones who know about stocks and shares. Of course no one really knows, but he quite seemed to know, and he often said stocks were up and shares were down in a way that would have made any woman respect him.

Mrs. Darling was married in white, and at first she kept the books perfectly, almost gleefully, as if it were a game, not so much as a Brussels sprout was missing; but by and by whole cauliflowers dropped out, and instead of them there were pictures of babies without faces. She drew them when she should have been totting up. They were Mrs. Darling's guesses.

Wendy came first, then John, then Michael.

For a week or two after Wendy came it was doubtful whether they would be able to keep her, as she was another mouth to feed. Mr. Darling was frightfully proud of her, but he was very honourable, and he sat on the edge of Mrs. Darling's bed, holding her hand and calculating expenses, while she looked at him imploringly. She wanted to risk it, come what might, but that was not his way; his way was with a pencil and a piece of paper, and if she confused him with suggestions he had to begin at the beginning again.

Previous Page of 58Next Page

Comments & Reviews (4)

Login or Facebook Sign in with Twitter


library_icon_grey.png Add share_icon_grey.png Share

Who's Reading

Recommended