The Astrologer's Portrait

The Astrologer's Portrait

1.2K Reads 141 Votes 47 Part Story
Joshua Grasso By JoshuaGrasso Completed

Prince Harold has fallen in love with a portrait, which he much prefers to his real bride-to-be. However, the portrait may be a hundred years old, and only the greatest sorcerer in the land can verify her existence. Unfortunately, Turold the Magnificent is currently on trial for maliciously impersonating a person of quality and despoiling her family history. Harold gets him off on the condition that they locate his lady love before his wedding to Sonya, who vows to kill him on their wedding night. Along with his faithless Russian servant, Dimitri, the three steal off to locate the true identity of the portrait-only to confront a curse much older than the portrait. To dispel the curse the prince must lead a revolution, fall in love with his wife, and release the centuries-old hands of Einhard the Black, who are eagerly awaiting their latest victim.

The novel is complete and I'll offer installments every few weeks.  Please vote and leave comments--let me know if this is something you would want to read to the end.  Thanks!

AhndriaDAblett AhndriaDAblett Dec 19, 2016
Intriguing beginning. Captures your attention to find out what happens when he encounters the portrait next.
relent relent Oct 21, 2016
The Queen is such a funny character, she reminds me of Lady Bracknell! Dimitri's "man has head of block" made me smile as well. I also loved reading about the Royal Astrologer and his artifacts, it all felt very magical.
JoshuaGrasso JoshuaGrasso Oct 21, 2016
Thanks so much for reading! Oscar Wilde is s big influence of course. I hope you find the remaining chapters as humorous and magical. Thanks again!
JoshuaGrasso JoshuaGrasso Jun 23, 2014
Thanks for reading them so quickly!  Glad you found the humor--you're very good at catching it.  I'm not sure fantasy is a genre that people readily associate with humor, but I try to add a bit here and there.
PatriciaReding PatriciaReding Jun 23, 2014
More great stuff. "Men were easy that way. So much more difficult for women whose vices demanded both skill and art."
                              
                              And I love this word picture: “ . . . and led the professor out, who gave another clumsy bow, vomiting another series of baubles and trinkets.”  Funny stuff.
                              
                              Voted.
PatriciaReding PatriciaReding Jun 23, 2014
I so enjoy your sense of humor: "My sister died of that ghastly tropical disease there . . . terribly unfashionable." LOL. My favorite though is: "Don't be silly . . . our family has always boasted a remarkable set of teeth."  
                              
                              Keep them coming!
                              
                              Voted.