Golf Dimension

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A family of four walked into the lobby of the mini-golf. While they had been in the arcade, Paul had noticed the advert for the mini-golf and had suggested to his family that they give it a go. They had all agreed enthusiastically, and so they had walked to the perimeter of the amusement park where the lobby for the mini-golf was.

It was a simple space with a desk and some storage racks behind it where the golf clubs glimmered in the light. On each side was a bucket full of golf balls. Opposite the desk were a few two-seaters as well as a drinks machine.

"Good day to you," the person manning the desk said with a friendly smile. "Four people is it?"

"Good day to you, too," Paul replied. "Yes, four people."

The man behind the desk turned around and pulled four clubs from the rack – two from the top and two from the bottom. He fished inside one of the buckets for some balls and placed all of it on the desk.

"Thank you," Paul said, picking the clubs up and handing them to his family. "As a matter of interest, how long on average does this course take to complete?" He picked the balls up and pocketed them to hand out once on the course.

"A single person would be able to complete it in around ten minutes, so I'd say you're looking at around half an hour, maybe a bit more."

As Paul gave thanks, the man indicated the door to the right of the desk is where they should go. As he started to move in that direction, he looked at the clock above the door.

The time showed 11:45.

"We don't have any cards to write our score down on," his wife then announced.

"We have systems that track that," the man informed. "You'll find this is a high-tech course."

"Oh," she uttered with slight disappointment. Paul knew she liked seeing the scores build up as the game progressed.

"Have fun," the man said to them as the family entered the door.

The corridor – if that's what it could be called – was all white, and it didn't look as though there was an exit. Turning around, Paul was surprised to find the door they had entered through had disappeared.

As he was about to say something, the whiteness disappeared, and after a few blinks to adjust his eyes, he saw that they were now on the course.

A massive one.

He looked around and noted that this was the only hole in the area. There was no sign of the lobby as he looked behind him, just a lot of grass. It was at least a nice day with the blue sky.

"Well, I guess we're committed to this," he said with a sigh, "but I don't see how this is going to be completed in half an hour."

He pulled the balls out of his pocket and dropped them to the ground. They magnetised to the starting point, with one being in the middle and the others forming a line off to one side.

He heard his kids say "Cool" in awe, and even he had to admit to being impressed. It was indeed a high-tech place.

A warning about the size of the course would have been preferred, though.

He let his kids decide which of them went first, and after a quick rock-paper-scissors, his son took up stance next to the blue ball. He hit it and started to chase it, and as he moved, Paul noticed the purple ball had rolled itself to the middle.

"I'll go next, keep an eye on him," he said quietly, and took up position.

His son had already hit the ball for a second time when Paul took his first shot, but it was powerful enough to end up near where his son's ball had stopped. Both of his kids were ten, and both enjoyed being active. He couldn't see how much they'd like this once they got to maybe even the third hole, considering he still couldn't see the end of this one.

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