Singularity Injection

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"You wanted me to update you on the Dragoon." Ambassador Primakov spoke through the communication console on Erin's desk.

"What's the update?" Erin Locke leaned forwards in her chair.

"He's missing."

"Missing?" Erin's eyes widened. "What do you mean 'missing'?"

"He's not on the Avalon, and his ship's gone."

"When did he leave?"

"He was checked in at Kaax. So sometime in the last two days -sometime after the jump."

"Hmm." Erin leaned back. "I guess whatever his orders are they're for this region. But where could he be heading off to now?" She wondered aloud. "And why?"

"Your guess is as good as mine," Primakov answered. "But I thought you'd like to know."

"Thank you, Ambassador."

Primakov nodded in acknowledgement. Erin switched off the console then input a communication request to engineering.

Technical Sergeant Titus' faced appeared on screen. "Ambassador Locke! How can I help you?"

"I was hoping to ask you a couple questions -if you're not too busy, of course."

"Sure. What're you wondering about?"

"It's about wormholes again."

Titus' laughed. "You're that into wormholes? You might've picked the wrong career."

"I was just doing some research."

"Research on wormholes? You got some spare time, or what?"

"You could say that. Have you heard of 'singularity injection'?"

"Sounds familiar."

"The idea is that even if you can't destroy a wormhole itself, you could theoretically plug it with a singularity -a black hole."

"Oh yeah." Titus smiled. "It's coming back to me now."

"You remember the details?"

"I know it's just theoretical."

"But some people think it has potential."

"It depends on some questionable assumptions about Hawking Funnel Geometry."

"You mind if I just run my understanding of it by you to see if it makes sense?"

"Sure." Titus nodded.

"I'm not gonna pretend to understand the math, or the wormhole geometry. But I think the basic idea is that if you position a blackhole within the perimeter of the wormhole, and you calibrate a trajectory field and an inverse field on the other side, then you could inject the singularity into the wormhole."

"That's the basic idea."

"And unless I'm mistaken, the singularity wouldn't have to be big -a microscopic one would even do the trick."

"I don't know. I'd have to see the math."

"For the sake of argument let's say the math checks out." According to one paper Erin had read, it did -even a microscopic singularity injected into a wormhole could shred a passing battlecruiser to atomic pieces. "If it does, then you could fit a singularity injection device on a single person craft, and you wouldn't need a gate."

"I guess so. You wouldn't need a big field for a microscopic object."

"And there's one other thing -the inverse trajectory field."

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