01. what defines a good/bad writers.

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The most important thing which you must always, and I mean always remember is that what defines a good/bad writer is not the writing quality

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The most important thing which you must always, and I mean always remember is that what defines a good/bad writer is not the writing quality.

A good writer is someone who constantly seeks improvement, who tries to master his writing for it to become something that defines him for who he is, throughout both his stories and the literary style.

A bad writer is someone who doesn't seek improvement, who believes that what he does is already perfect and, therefore is probably quite narrow-minded. It's someone who believes himself to be perhaps even superior to other writers and who desires nothing more than fame and success throughout bland works.

If you're the bad type of writer, then I sincerely feel sorry for you, because trust me, I've been in that category for years now.

Now defining the quality of one's writing style is a much different thing. It's usually extremely subjective and I simply believe that no one is to judge one's way of writing. It's just that, well, some things can be changed when a story is written in a very poor manner, with bad grammar and spelling, no time concordance, bad punctuation, short, choppy sentences (or long nonsensical gibberish), etc. I believe that I can be of help with such things.

That's one thing said.

The second thing is that, yes, a good writer can write an awfully cliché story, which people will adore and perhaps even worship because people are naturally attracted to some clichés. Others just never bother to look deeper than the surface of the water. Clichés don't transform a good author into a bad author, no. Clichés simply transform the potential of a story into waste. Clichés affect a story, not its author.

We find these clichés everywhere we go, and it is absolutely impossible to avoid them, since the human brain always bases what it does on what it has seen in the past. It only ever copies, it barely ever creates. If your brain doesn't copy and transform what it sees to interpret them in your everyday life, then you're probably not human.

But that's okay, we're all open and acceptant here.

So basically, even if it is humanly impossible to dodge clichés, the best thing you can do is avoid the biggest ones, and to avoid them, you must at first stop to read those awful stories that have literally millions of views. I naturally mean the ones that have name such as "i am a sex slave and i'm falling for my abusive billionaire master". Try to look for stories that have perhaps less views. It can be 100K reads like it can be ten reads. All writers start somewhere, and you might discover the pearl at the bottom of the sea.

Anyway, those stories with literal millions of views are the epitome of the cliché by excellence. Avoid those as much as you can. Stick to better stories. Avoid the whole sex slave and billionaire boy stories, you won't find any beauty in those.

Once you've deleted such stories from your library, you can start looking for better stories. Aim for things that look different—and I'm not talking about those dodgy looking stories that don't have a cover—I mean the ones that look more... artistic. When you read them, there are more chances that the writer is consenhsious of the appearance of his covers, and therefore of his stories, especially if he made them himself.

If the writer cares about what he does, you know you're already on a good path.

If he doesn't well... leave. You'll usually know after only reading the first paragraph, when the story starts with the protagonist's morning routine which no one truly cares about. If your story starts with a morning routine, don't be offended by my words, please. I hate butt-hurt people.

Now I'm only really talking about fanfictions here (I know it's the theme of this book) but the best way to actually get rid of clichés is to read. Read lots and lots of real books made out of paper (not pixels). I'm not talking about books such as The Fault In Our Stars or The Hunger Games, but books which are pretty to read, with a rich vocabulary and a certain elegance in the sentences' formulation. Try reading classic shit, it's the base of all writing and it is the greatest of all ways to learn. I can't really think about any great English speaking authors right now since I've barely read any, but, as an example, my story 'Walburga' (which you should totally check out) is inspired by the journal of one of Marie-Antoinette's maids, and also by 'Vipère au poing' by Hervé Bazin (a French author).

You can of course base yourself of films you've seen. Good films though, not some crap like 'Middle school, the worst years of my life', but more like 'Kill Your Darlings' (that film is very poetic) or 'Dead Poets Society' (greatest film ever made). If you need some recommendations, my list of beautiful films is endless.

I'll end this chapter here, if you have things to add, don't hesitate to comment them

Oops! This image does not follow our content guidelines. To continue publishing, please remove it or upload a different image.

I'll end this chapter here, if you have things to add, don't hesitate to comment them. You can also ask me to write about something which you need help with.

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