Never call WOLF . . .

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'Three times and your are out', or best know as 'The boy who cried, Wolf'

An Aesop Fable, which has many versions over thousands of year told as a cautionary, warning tale, an allegory about needing help vs attention getting and the consequences, which makes an ever lasting story true at all time.

An Aesop Fable, which has many versions over thousands of year told as a cautionary, warning tale, an allegory about needing help vs attention getting and the consequences, which makes an ever lasting story true at all time

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Never call wolf . . .

Once upon a time a long time ago, or maybe today, a sheepherder tending his flock of sheep on a hill side day in and day out becomes lonely and bored so for the joy of folly yells, "Wolf!" He does not notice that a wolf pack hiding in the bushes and watching.

The townspeople run up the hill with their picks and axes. The young sheepherder laughs. The townspeople shake their heads and warn the lad. The wolves continue to observe the young herder.

Again bored, the sheepherder yells, "Wolf!" Fewer town people come running with their picks and axes. They are laughed at for their efforts by the young herder. They warn the lad, "This is the last."

The wolves know the time is ripe, in they rush for their meal. The young sheepherder yells and yells, "WOLF!"No one comes from the village to help him. Alone he beats off the pack only all the sheep are eaten or dragged off into the woods.

The young sheepherder walks alone through the village head down.

Be careful how many times you yell, "HELP!"

This telling I did at Ageless Tales/Age Tellers, July 21, 2001, Dominican University, Storytelling Class, Sandra Noman, a great storyteller and teacher; Stagebridge, one great group for learning, 2001; and Feather River Family Camp, Quince, CA 2004 and on and on and on - Aesops's stories are ancient proven simple stories.

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The BEST of The BEST SOURCES!

These stories cut and pasted from mythfolklore.net, 2008, Aesopica: Aesop's Fables in English, Latin & Greek, Aesop's Fables, http://mythfolklore.net/aesopica/index.htm, Oxford University Press reissued the World's Classics series with new covers, and with new ISBN numbers. The contents of the book remain the same.

The list is contains 584 Aesop's Fables in the (PERRY 210 Index List) http://mythfolklore.net/aesopica/perry/index.htm or http://mythfolklore.net/aesopica/perry/210.htm for the Aesopica a gigantic appendix in Perry's edition of Babrius and Phaedrus for the Loeb Classical Library (Harvard University Press: Cambridge, 1965), a must for anyone interested in the Aesopic fable tradition, invaluable, http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/28

English versions of Aesop: In addition to the illustrated editions mentioned above, there are some text-only English editions at this website. The oldest printed English version of Aesop dates back to William Caxton in 1484. The first English version of Aesop specifically intended for children was published by Sir Roger L'Estrange in 1692. The most recent and most complete English translation was published by Laura Gibbs for Oxford World's Classics in 2002.

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