Hudibras by Samuel Butler

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HUDIBRAS BY SAMUEL BUTLER

Transcriber's Notes:

Credits: This e-text was scanned, proofed and edited with a

glossary and translations from the Latin by Donal O' Danachair.

(kodak_seaside@hotmail.com). The text is that of an edition

published in London, 1805. This e-text is hereby placed in the

public domain.

Spelling and punctuation: These are the same as in the book as

far as possible. The AE and OE digraphs have been transcribed

as two letters. Greek words have been transliterated.

Notes: The notes are identified by letters in the text, thus: <a>.

In a few cases the note has no text reference: these are indicated <>.

Layout: the line numbers all end in col. 65. View this e-text in a

monospaced font such as Courier and they will all line up in the

right margin.

Latin: All translations are by the transcriber. In the notes, they

immediately follow the Latin text in [square brackets].

Translations of Latin phrases in the poem are in the glossary.

Disclaimer: these translations are probably very inaccurate - I

am no great Latin scholar.

HUDIBRAS

IN

THREE PARTS

WRITTEN IN

THE TIME OF THE LATE WARS

---------------------

BY SAMUEL BUTLER, ESQ.

---------------------

WITH

ANNOTATIONS

AND

AN INDEX

------

TO THE READER.

Poeta nascitur non fit, [poets are born, not made] is a sentence

of as great truth as antiquity; it being most certain, that all the

acquired learning imaginable is insufficient to compleat a poet,

without a natural genius and propensity to so noble and sublime

an art. And we may, without offence, observe, that many very

learned men, who have been ambitious to be thought poets,

have only rendered themselves obnoxious to that satyrical

inspiration our Author wittily invokes:

Which made them, though it were in spight

Of nature and their stars, to write.

On the one side some who have had very little human learning,

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