What makes you believe?


  • katbug9608
    katbug9608
    2 years ago

    thank you @Sapphire28 but I am a christian. So, I do believe in God, and however I do like your perspective and I see where you are comming from.

  • _Sapphire28
    _Sapphire28
    2 years ago

    @katbug9608 Oh, I know that you are a Christian and completely understand your conviction. I was merely explaining my own opinion, because that is what all of our statements are: opinions. There is no right or wrong. There is simply what you believe in. Unfortunately, we don't and probably never will know for sure.

  • _VRVain
    _VRVain
    2 years ago

    The human mind has a certain portion which is alike in all human being it resides in. There are certain emotions that are inherent or inborn with us. We have a tendency to rationalise things in a way that pleases or comforts us. Not a single life form is equal in existence on this earth. Some changes however minute or unperceived they may be always exist. The one who believes to be in a less advantageous position will either try to rise above its station or be content with it. This ideology or inborn sense of rationalisation is what makes people believe in anything. I dont know if this made any sense.

  • _VRVain
    _VRVain
    2 years ago

    A quote from Shakespeare's play Julius Caesar- '' Men may construe things after their own fashion. '' A single event or word can be interpreted in millions of different ways depending on the no. of people it is perceived by and each will have a different but a totally plausible and perfect explanation for themselves.

  • _ForkedTongues
    _ForkedTongues
    2 years ago

    @katbug9608 The theories can't be less likely since they are SCIENTIFIC theories. People just don't come up with them you know. People research and experiment so they are pretty valid but yes, some have holes in them.

  • _ForkedTongues
    _ForkedTongues
    2 years ago

    @TheLocalGuerilla I think people believe because they just see the theories, they don't really study them, they just have misconstrued ideas about what such theories talk about. Honestly, I haven't even studied them so it makes me answering pointless. But I've always wanted to. When I do though, I'll definitely tell you why.

  • VeroAmore
    VeroAmore
    2 years ago

    To address the scientific aspect of it, so much of the bible fits in with science (google 'Ark of the Covenant and battery' and see what comes up). Analyzing the creation story with an open and scientific mind you can see how the Big Bang, Evolution and Creation fit together. I also know however, that the bible is not entirely true as there are two creation stories in Genesis; I believe the first, which fits with theories like the Big Bang. I take what I know of my god, that he is all-knowing and all-loving and that is how I interpret my faith.

    The reason I believe as I do is that two years ago, at a very dark point in my life I decided to kill myself. God saved me just hours before I was going to. How can I doubt when every breath I take is a reminder of what He has done for me? Every day that I wake up I am able to thank God because I know how close I came to never waking up again.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    @VeroAmore Praise the Lord you are saved! Me too. Another great testimony of science vs religion is proof of the Star of Bethlehem http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCLmRB-OpGE

  • Hikari13
    Hikari13
    2 years ago

    Belief isn't something you can easily explain. I'm Muslim, and my belief in God is something I feel to be true in my soul.

    @Hardy_Boyz I disagree with your statement. I understand that you have your own view, but if you knew a thing about Islam, you would know that the Prophet Muhammed (Peace Be Upon Him) was illiterate, and how could an illiterate man produce a work of such beauty and poetry as the Quraan? I must ask you, have you ever read the Quraan? You will not find a single contradiction! You speak against ignorance, yet you are clearly a person of ignorance. I have a verse of the Quraan which may be of particular interest to you. It says, "Never will the Jews or the Christians be satisfied until you follow their form of religion. Say: The guidance of Allah is the (only) guidance..."Chapter 2 verse 120, (Yusuf Ali translation) @TheLocalGuerilla On the question of science, the Quraan contains details of science that were unknown to man during that period in history. I saw some mention of the Big Bang Theory. I stand to be corrected, but the English translation of that particular verse does speak to non-believers. It is, "Do not the Unbeliever see that the Heavens [here, the particular word for Heavens refers to space as well] and the Earth were joined together (as one unit of creation) before We clove them asunder? We made from water every living thing. Will they not then believe?" Chapter 21 verse 30 (Yusuf Ali translation) This verse states two well known scientific theories/facts. It speaks of the Big Bang and of the fact that water is the base of life. I hope this clears things up for you.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    My dear Muslim friend, I understand more than you realize. I understand that the truth has been spoken. It has been written for us to seek & learn from. All basic religions formed over time have come from the true & false teachings of who God really is. We have a responsibility to seek the truth for ourselves (not because our parents made us) but seek God for ourselves and develop a relationship with him. Jews, Christians & Muslims believe in a monotheistic God. We all agree that God made a covenant with Abraham. Jews and Christians trust in Yahweh=God. We know the story of Abraham and we see that Muslims believe a different version. This is important because it is the root of all the conflict! Jews & Christians believe that God made a promise to Abram to give him an heir (a child of promise…for believing and trusting him.) This son will be a child of promise who God will bless and make a great nation too numerous to count. But Sarai seemed too old to conceive so she thought up a plan and gave her husband Abram her mistress (Sarai’s Egyptian servant Hagar.) Abram listened to his wife and took the servant as his own and bore a son with her. Sarai grew jealous and was tormented in knowing she had created this plan. Hagar ran away from her mistress Sarai because she was being mistreated but an angel of the LORD found Hagar and spoke to her telling her to go back to her mistress (Sarai) and submit to her. The angel of the LORD told her that she will give birth to a son and told her to name him “Ishmael.” Then the angel of the Lord said that he has heard of Hagar’s misery and warned that Ishmael will be a “wild donkey of a man;” and “his hand will be against everyone and everyone’s hand against him, and he will live in hostility toward all his brothers.”

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    Abram was eighty-six years old when Hagar bore him Ishmael. Ishmael - the son of the Egyptian slave woman - is the father of the Arab nations, most of whom today are Muslim....Abram went on to bare the son of promise by trusting in God. Isaac was born to Abram and Sarai (as promised) one year later. God changed Abrams name to Abraham (father of many nations) and Sarai to Sarah (princess and mother of many nations.) Isaac was blessed by God as promised. God told Abraham that Kings will be the descendants of Isaac. This included Yeshua (Jesus!) God gave the land of Israel to Abraham and his descendants. God also promised that Ishmael will be blessed but his covenant will be with Isaac…the son of promise. Galatians 4 tells us that Ishmael had been "born according to the flesh" while Isaac had been "born according to the promise". Isaac replaced Ishmael as the favored son and heir. This, of course, made Ishmael jealous and bitter. As a result, he mocked and disdained his half-brother. Eventually the situation became so intolerable that Abraham's wife Sarah demanded that Ishmael and his Egyptian concubine mother, Hagar, be expelled permanently from Abraham's family. So you see…the Arab people who are descendants of Ishmael (are blessed by God but fail to recognize that God made a covenant with Isaac not Ishmael so, Arabs who believe that the bible has suffered flaws from the various translations from the original Hebrew & Greek into Latin & English are believing a lie. The bible in fact is preserved in its truest form and confirmed again and again by comparing with ancient text. There has been many translations and editions but never a revision made to the original transcripts. People who choose to believe that a illiterate prophet (a descendant of Ishmael) from centuries later somehow miraculously had authority from God to revise the truth is treading on dangerous ground.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    Lets examine Islam for a moment: Islam has its focus on a deity by the name of "Allah." Muslims claim that Allah in pre-Islamic times and was the biblical God of the Patriarchs, prophets, and apostles. Muslim's believe this continuity is essential for the attempt to convert Jews and Christians. Muslim’s believe "Allah" is part of the flow of the divine revelation of Scripture, thus it is the next step in biblical religion. Therefore they believe we should all become Muslims. But, on the other hand, if Allah was a pre-Islamic pagan deity, then its core claim is refuted. Religious claims often fall before the results of hard sciences such as archeology. We can endlessly speculate about the past or go and dig it up and see what the evidence reveals. This is the only way to find out the truth concerning the origins of Allah. As we shall see, the hard evidence demonstrates that the god Allah was a pagan deity. In fact, he was the Moon-god who was married to the sun goddess and the stars were his daughters. Archaeologists have uncovered temples to the Moon-god throughout the Middle East. From the mountains of Turkey to the banks of the Nile, the most wide-spread religion of the ancient world was the worship of the Moon-god. In the first literate civilization, the Sumerians have left us thousands of clay tablets in which they described their religious beliefs. The ancient Sumerians worshipped a Moon-god who was called many different names. The most popular names were Nanna, Suen and Asimbabbar. His symbol was the crescent moon. Given the amount of artifacts concerning the worship of this Moon-god, it is clear that this was the dominant religion in Sumeria. The cult of the Moon-god was the most popular religion throughout ancient Mesopotamia.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    The Assyrians, Babylonians, and the Akkadians took the word Suen and transformed it into the word Sin as their favorite name for the Moon-God. In ancient Syria and Canna, the Moon-god Sin was usually represented by the moon in its crescent phase. At times the full moon was placed inside the crescent moon to emphasize all the phases of the moon. The sun-goddess was the wife of Sin and the stars were their daughters. For example, Istar was a daughter of Sin. Sacrifices to the Moon-god are described in the Pas Shamra texts. In the Ugaritic texts, the Moon-god was sometimes called Kusuh. In Persia, as well as in Egypt, the Moon-god is depicted on wall murals and on the heads of statues. He was the Judge of men and gods. The Old Testament constantly rebuked the worship of the Moon-god (see: Deut. 4:19;17:3; II Kngs. 21:3,5; 23:5; Jer. 8:2; 19:13; Zeph. 1:5, etc.) When Israel fell into idolatry, it was usually the cult of the Moon-god. As a matter of fact, everywhere in the ancient world, the symbol of the crescent moon can be found on seal impressions, steles, pottery, amulets, clay tablets, cylinders, weights, earrings, necklaces, wall murals, etc. In Tell-el-Obeid, a copper calf was found with a crescent moon on its forehead. An idol with the body of a bull and the head of man has a crescent moon inlaid on its forehead with shells. In Ur, the Stela of Ur-Nammu has the crescent symbol placed at the top of the register of gods because the Moon-god was the head of the gods. Even bread was baked in the form of a crescent as an act of devotion to the Moon-god.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    The Ur of the Chaldees was so devoted to the Moon-god that it was sometimes called Nannar in tablets from that time period. Thousands of inscriptions from walls and rocks in Northern Arabia have also been found. Reliefs and votive bowls used in worship of the "daughters of Allah" have also been discovered. The three daughters, al-Lat, al-Uzza and Manat are sometimes depicted together with Allah the Moon-god represented by a crescent moon above them. The archeological evidence demonstrates that the dominant religion of Arabia was the cult of the Moon-god. Many scholars have also noticed that the Moon-god's name "Sin" is a part of such Arabic words as "Sinai," the "wilderness of Sin," etc. When the popularity of the Moon-god waned elsewhere, the Arabs remained true to their conviction that the Moon-god was the greatest of all gods. While they worshipped 360 gods at the Kabah in Mecca, the Moon-god was the chief deity. Mecca was in fact built as a shrine for the Moon-god. Evidence gathered from both North and South Arabia demonstrate that Moon-god worship was clearly active even in Muhammad's day and was still the dominant cult. According to numerous inscriptions, while the name of the Moon-god was Sin, his title was al-ilah, i.e. "the deity," meaning that he was the chief or high god among the gods. As Coon pointed out, "The god Il or Ilah was originally a phase of the Moon God." The Moon-god was called al- ilah, i.e. the god, which was shortened to Allah in pre-Islamic times.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    The pagan Arabs even used Allah in the names they gave to their children. For example, both Muhammad's father and uncle had Allah as part of their names. The fact that they were given such names by their pagan parents proves that Allah was the title for the Moon-god even in Muhammad's day. This fact answers the questions, "Why is Allah never defined in the Qur'an? Why did Muhammad assume that the pagan Arabs already knew who Allah was?" Muhammad was raised in the religion of the Moon-god Allah. But he went one step further than his fellow pagan Arabs. While they believed that Allah, i.e. the Moon-god, was the greatest of all gods and the supreme deity in a pantheon of deities, Muhammad decided that Allah was not only the greatest god but the only god. In effect he said, "Look, you already believe that the Moon-god Allah is the greatest of all gods. All I want you to do is to accept that the idea that he is the only god. I am not taking away the Allah you already worship. I am only taking away his wife and his daughters and all the other gods." This is seen from the fact that the first point of the Muslim creed is not, "Allah is great" but "Allah is the greatest," i.e., he is the greatest among the gods. Why would Muhammad say that Allah is the "greatest" except in a polytheistic context? The Arabic word is used to contrast the greater from the lesser. That this is true is seen from the fact that the pagan Arabs never accused Muhammad of preaching a different Allah than the one they already worshipped. This "Allah" was the Moon-god according to the archeological evidence. Muhammad thus attempted to have it both ways. To the pagans, he said that he still believed in the Moon-god Allah. To the Jews and the Christians, he said that Allah was their God too.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    But both the Jews and the Christians knew better and that is why they rejected his god Allah as a false god. Early Christian apologists against Islam, pointed out that Islam and its god Allah did not come from the Bible but from the paganism of the Sabeans. They did not worship the God of the Bible but the Moon-god and his daughters al-Uzza, al-Lat and Manat. The Arabs worshipped the Moon-god as a supreme deity. But this was not biblical monotheism. While the Moon-god was greater than all other gods and goddesses, this was still a polytheistic pantheon of deities. Now that we have seen actual idols of the Moon-god, it is no longer possible to avoid the fact that Allah was a pagan god in pre-Islamic times. Is it any wonder then that the symbol of Islam is the crescent moon? That a crescent moon sits on top of their mosques and minarets? That a crescent moon is found on the flags of Islamic nations? That the Muslims fast during the month which begins and ends with the appearance of the crescent moon in the sky? In conclusion: The pagan Arabs worshipped the Moon-god Allah by praying toward Mecca several times a day; making a pilgrimage to Mecca; running around the temple of the Moon-god called the Kabah; kissing the black stone; killing an animal in sacrifice to the Moon-god; throwing stones at the devil; fasting for the month which begins and ends with the crescent moon; giving alms to the poor, etc., Muslim's claim that Allah is the God of the Bible and that Islam arose from the religion of the prophets and apostles is refuted by solid, overwhelming archeological evidence.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    Islam is nothing more than a revival of the ancient Moon-god cult. It has taken the symbols, the rites, the ceremonies, and even the name of its god from the ancient pagan religion of the Moon-god. As such, it is sheer idolatry and must be rejected by all those who follow the Torah and Gospel. The religion of ancient Israel was based on revelation; the Old Testament says that God appeared in diverse places and spoke to the Patriarchs; there they raised altars of undressed stones, called Beth-el—or House of God. Man's sensual imagination soon led him "to collect his gods in the dust and fashion them as he pleased," imagining that God resided in these Stones. Thus it became Beth-aven or House of Vanity. Beth-el abounded in Chaldea, Asia, Egypt, Africa, Greece, in remote parts of Europe, among the Druids, Gauls, and Celto-Scythians, and in North and South America. In the Hebrew language, stones fallen from the sky are called Bethel (Heb. "House of God"). After dreaming of a ladder reaching to heaven, Jacob called his stone pillow a Bethel-stone (Genesis 28:10-22). "The Pagans imitated the Beth-el of Jacob and consecrated them with oil and blood, making them gods, calling them Betyles (betylus, baetyl, betyles). In classical antiquity a stone, either

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    Islam is nothing more than a revival of the ancient Moon-god cult. It has taken the symbols, the rites, the ceremonies, and even the name of its god from the ancient pagan religion of the Moon-god. As such, it is sheer idolatry and must be rejected by all those who follow the Torah and Gospel. The religion of ancient Israel was based on revelation; the Old Testament says that God appeared in diverse places and spoke to the Patriarchs; there they raised altars of undressed stones, called Beth-el—or House of God. Man's sensual imagination soon led him "to collect his gods in the dust and fashion them as he pleased," imagining that God resided in these Stones. Thus it became Beth-aven or House of Vanity. Beth-el abounded in Chaldea, Asia, Egypt, Africa, Greece, in remote parts of Europe, among the Druids, Gauls, and Celto-Scythians, and in North and South America. In the Hebrew language, stones fallen from the sky are called Bethel (Heb. "House of God"). After dreaming of a ladder reaching to heaven, Jacob called his stone pillow a Bethel-stone (Genesis 28:10-22). "The Pagans imitated the Beth-el of Jacob and consecrated them with oil and blood, making them gods, calling them Betyles (betylus, baetyl, betyles). In classical antiquity a stone, either natural or artificially shaped, venerated as of divine origin, or as a symbol of divinity. There were a number of these sacred stones in Greece, the most famous being on the omphalos at Delphi. The greater part of the natural Betyles were the black meteorites or fire-balls fallen from the heavens and regarded by the Sabeists as heavenly divinities. These meteorites were the Cabiri, and the Pelasgi.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    Meteorites-cults are common in Greco-Roman civilizations. According to the religious historian Mircea Eliade, the Temple of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus contained a squat statue of the mother-goddess, carved from a meteorite that fell from Jupiter (Acts 19:26-35). "The most famous of all of the stone fetishes of Arabia was, of course, the black stone in the sanctuary of Mecca. The Kabah was, and still is, a rectangular stone structure. Built into its Eastern corner is the black stone which had been an object of worship for many centuries before Mohammed appropriated the Kabah for his new religion, and made the pilgrimage to this holy place one of the pillars of Islam" The "Hadschar al Aswad" in the Kabah is the most well known example of meteorite worship in newer times. Despite the prohibition of portraying God and adoration of objects, pilgrims to Mecca kiss this "Hadschar al Aswad" (black stone) which, according to the prophet is "Yamin Allah" (the right hand of God), supposedly a divine meteorite or Bethel-stone predating creation that fell at the feet of Adam and Eve. It is presently embedded in the southeastern corner of the Kabah. Muslims touch and kiss the black stone during Hajj.

  • Hardy_Boyz
    Hardy_Boyz
    2 years ago

    The religion of Islam is very mush like Judaism and Catholicism (Religions based on rules, rituals and condemnation.) But Christianity is truly a relationship with God through His word with the understanding that we are descendants from Abraham. Heirs of the promise. The bible shows the genealogy from Adam & Eve to Abraham & Isaac to King David to Jesus. Anyone can belong to His family now if we believe that God fulfilled His promise and sent us the substitute (Jesus) to take our place as sinful man. Jesus warned us against false prophets. God is clear about adding to His word or removing the content of His word. Muhammad could never be taken as a (real) prophet from God because he stands against the one and only true living God. Muhammad denies Jesus as the son of God who was offered as the eternal sacrifice for all mankind. Don’t you see? Abraham was tested by God to see if he would trust him with his “promised son Isaac.” God in turn saved Isaac from being the actual sacrifice but years later offered up His own son (Jesus.) For God so loved the world that he gave his only son and for those who believe upon him shall not perish but have everlasting life.

  • _ForkedTongues
    _ForkedTongues
    2 years ago

    @Hardy_Boyz I laughed out loud when you called Islam an idolatry when there are no idols. And where are you getting these quotes from? Muhammad (S.A.W) never said that. I've read the Quran and I've read the Sunnah of the Prophet, and nowhere is that mentioned. Muhammad (PBUH) never said to Arabians to believe because both believed in Allah. In fact, he denied ALL their gods. He destroyed ALL their idols.

    And which Bible are you talking about? WHICH ONE OUT OF THE ALL THE BIBLE'S is in true form? There's just one Quran, despite the divisions Islam, all Muslims read from the same book. Can you say the same for Christianity?

    And the whole Abraham thing is just ridiculous. Ismail (SA) was a prophet.

  • _ForkedTongues
    _ForkedTongues
    2 years ago

    Considering this being bitter and hateful to his brother is out of option. It doesn't even matter who descended from who. Being descendants doesn't anybody much better, or worse so it doesn't matter. Even if Ismail was bitter, that is in no relation with the Prophet(PBUH). Jesus (SA) wasn't good because Isaac was good.

    Also the Moon-god thing. The word Allah, is not a contract to alilah. Had it been so, then the expression ya Allah ('O Allah!') would have been ungrammatical, because according to the Arabic language when you address someone by the vocative form ya followed by a title, the al ('the') must be dropped from the title. For example, you cannot say ya ar-rabb but must say ya rabb (for 'O Lord'). So if the word Allah was al-ilah ('the God'), we would not be able to say: ya Allah, which we do. You should keep in mind that Arabic is a much more complex language than english, due to this, alilah and Allah can't be the same as they have different meanings. Alilah means 'god'. Allah ... is a proper name applied to the Being Who exists necessarily, by Himself, comprising all the attributes of perfection, a proper name denoting the true god ... the al being INESPERABLE FROM IT, NOT DERIVED.

    Muhammad's uncle's name was Abu Talib. Hmmm, do I see Allah somewhere there? I don't think so. And Muhammad's father's name. Abdullah, means the servant of God. Not Allah but alilah. There is a difference. He was obviously not muslim so it only makes sense.

  • TheLocalGuerilla
    TheLocalGuerilla
    2 years ago

    Wow... someone... just actually copied the Bible onto Wattpad. Impressive...

  • _suspiciouscranberry
    _suspiciouscranberry
    1 year ago

    I believe that God sends certain people or things into our life to bring us closer to Him. Even people who are Atheist or aren't part of any religion are constantly hearing about God, constantly blocking God out of their lives.... but... well, He's God. So, it doesn't really matter how hard you try to block Him out, He'll still be there. I believe the people who are trying to run away from God are going to be found by Him eventually, in the craziest, most amazing way possible. :) It's all part of God's amazing plan.

  • _Freezing_Fire
    _Freezing_Fire
    1 year ago

    What makes me believe? There are many reasons to believe. The Quran is a phenomenon in itself that makes me believe. I believe because it gives me a purpose.

    I watched this video made by an ex-atheist/ atheist. He said that if he were to walk down a street and find a watch, he'd instantly assume that there was a creator. That someone had created that watch. And he went on giving more examples of other things that he'd instantly assume there was a creator (Someone made that pencil, someone shaped that jar etc.) Thn he came to the conclusion that, if he were to see something as simple as a watch and assume there was a creator. Then how could he look at something so beautiful as the Earth and not assume there was a creator?

    I believe because there is proof. In the Quran. In history. You can't just ignore all that evidence! I believe because sometimes, when I pray to God/Allah for something. It actually happens. And I would stand there gobsmacked feeling all holy.

    The question is, what makes you disbelieve?