How to Take Flattering Photos of Yourself

spinner.gif

How to Take Flattering Photos of Yourself

Do you need some nice pictures of yourself to display on livejournal or myspace? Try these tricks to create the best image to present to others.

Steps:

Relax.

Taking pictures of yourself is far less stressful than modeling for someone else. If you take 100 bad photos, you can just delete them off your digital camera before anyone can see.

Start off by taking the photos on a day when you feel comfortable about how you look. It helps if you have some confidence, and it shows. Put on some makeup if you like, do your hair a bit, anything that will make you feel better about yourself. If you take a bunch of photos on a low self-esteem day, no matter how they look you'll find fault in them!

Experiment with settings. A flash can really wash you out, which can be a blessing if you have lots of blemishes, but just know that people aren't stupid and if you've made the picture so bright that your nose is gone kids on Myspace will know something's up. Also, you can set the camera to have different tints depending on the light.

There is one setting, which is usually indicated by a little light bulb, and this generally makes everything tinted blue if you don't use the flash. Just play around with all the different options on your camera and see which one makes you look the best.

Take as many pictures as you can. You'll have a lot to pick from when you're done and the more options the better.

If you have even a slight double chin never take the photo from underneath your face. A seemingly universally flattering angle is slightly above and having your face turned at an angle.

Emphasize the parts you like about yourself. If you have nice lips, a good way to show them off is to tip your head upward so the camera is underneath your lips, which makes them look even fuller. If you don't have full lips, a way to make them appear fuller is lots of lip-gloss with a little dab of shimmering white in the center of your mouth.

Hide your stomach. If you are nervous about your stomach being pouchy, then lie on your bed and reach the camera up with one arm in front of your face and lay on your side. It creates the effect of a really lean body behind your face.

Use Photoshop to hide flaws. Open Photoshop > open the IMAGE option > OPEN ADJUSTMENTS > click AUTO LEVELS. See, doesn't that look better already? Also in that same menu is the overused brightness/contrast option. Use it, of course, but just remember less is more.

Use black and white for a change. This can be very flattering in that it hides unbalanced skin tones and all that other business we can't conceal with makeup alone.

Stay away from the filters; if you don't know how to use them properly, they always end up looking lame and very AOL web page from 1997.

Experiment with Photoshop. Use the burn tool [a little hand], the saturation tool [a sponge], and the dodge tool [sort of looks like a black lollipop], which are all in the menu bar.

Tips:

If you want your picture to stand out at all, don't show pictures of you with your arms around your friends at a party, those photos are boring and all alike.

Web cam pictures are always pretty grainy looking and you can't really change the angle, so unless you can avoid it, use an actual camera.

Nothing is more cliche than seeing your arm extending out to take the photo. Consider using a timer and setting up the camera. You can also try experimenting with different angles to avoid the cheesy look of an arm extending out.

A good way to take a self-photo is by using a mirror. If you want only a face shot, stand close to the mirror; you can use a full-length mirror for body shots. Make sure the camera's not blocking your face, unless you want it to.

If you don't want to have the camera in the picture with you, stand in front of a mirror and hold the camera out so you can see yourself in the screen even though the camera is facing you.

Don't always look directly into the camera lens! Everyone does that. Look above, below, to the right or to the left of the lens for some intriguing poses.

Comments & Reviews (2)

Login or Facebook Sign in with Twitter


library_icon_grey.png Add share_icon_grey.png Share

Who's Reading

Recommended