Previous Page of 80Next Page

Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves

spinner.gif

A FOLK HISTORY OF SLAVERY ***

Produced by Andrea Ball and PG Distributed Proofreaders. Produced from images provided by the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division.

[TR: ***] = Transcriber Note [HW: ***] = Handwritten Note

SLAVE NARRATIVES

A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves

TYPEWRITTEN RECORDS PREPARED BY THE FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT 1936-1938 ASSEMBLED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PROJECT WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SPONSORED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

WASHINGTON 1941

VOLUME II

ARKANSAS NARRATIVES

PART 7

Prepared by the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Arkansas

INFORMANTS

Vaden, Charlie Vaden, Ellen Van Buren, Nettie Vaughn, Adelaide J.

Wadille [TR: Waddille], Emmeline Wadille (Waddell), Emmeline (Emiline) Waldon, Henry Walker, Clara Walker, Henry Walker, Jake Walker, Jake Wallace, Willie Warrior, Evans Washington, Anna Washington, Eliza Washington, Jennie Washington, Parrish Watson, Caroline Watson, Mary Wayne, Bart Weathers, Annie Mae Weathers, Cora Webb, Ishe Wells, Alfred Wells, Douglas Wells, John Wells, Sarah Wells, Sarah Williams Wesley, John Wesley, Robert Wesmoland, Maggie West, Calvin West, Mary Mays Wethington, Sylvester Whitaker, Joe White, Julia A. White, Lucy Whiteman, David Whiteside, Dolly Whitfield, J.W. Whitmore, Sarah Wilborn, Dock Wilks, Bell Williams, Bell Williams, Charley Williams, Charlie Williams, Columbus Williams, Frank Williams, Gus Williams, Henrietta Williams, Henry Andrew (Tip) Williams, James Williams, John Williams, Lillie Williams, Mary Williams, Mary Williams, Mary Williams, Rosena Hunt Williams, III, William Ball (Soldier) Williamson, Anna Williamson, Callie Halsey Willis, Charlotte Wilson, Ella Wilson, Robert Windham, Tom Wise, Alice Wise, Frank Withers, Lucy Woods, Anna Woods, Cal Woods, Maggie Word, Sam Worthy, Ike Wright, Alice Wright, Hannah Brooks

Yates, Tom Young, Annie Young, John

FOLKLORE SUBJECTS

Name of Interviewer: Irene Robertson Subject: NEGRO LORE Story:--Information

This information given by: Charlie Vaden Place of Residence: Hazen, Green Grove, Ark. Occupation: Farming Age: 77 [TR: Information moved from bottom of first page.]

Charlie Vaden's father ran away and went to the war to fight. He was a slave and left his owner. His mother died when he was five years old but before she died she gave Charlie to Mrs. Frances Owens (white lady). She came to Des Arc and ran the City Hotel. He never saw his father till he was grown. He worked for Mrs. Owens. He never did run with colored folks then. He nursed her grandchildren, Guy and Ira Brown. When he was grown he bought a farm at Green Grove. It consisted of a house and forty-seven acres of land. He farmed two years. A fortune teller came along and told him he was going to marry but he better be careful that they wouldn't live together or he might "drop out." He went ahead and married like he was "fixing" to do. They just couldn't get along, so they got divorced.

They had the wedding at her house and preacher Isarel Thomas (colored) married them and they went on to his house. He don't remember how she was dressed except in white and he had a "new outfit too."

Next he married Lorine Rogers at the Green Grove Church and took her home. She fell off the porch with a tub of clothes and died from it just about a year after they married.

He married again at the church and lived with her twenty years. They had four girls and four boys. She died from the change of life.

The last wife he didn't live with either. She is still living.

Had another fortune teller tell his fortune. She said, "Uncle, you are pretty good but be careful or you'll be walking around begging for victuals." He said it had nearly come to that now except it hurt him to walk. (He can hardly walk.) He believes some of what the fortune tellers tell comes true. He has been on the same farm since 1887, which is forty-nine years, and did fine till four years ago. He can't work, couldn't pay taxes, and has lost his land.

He was paralized five months, helpless as a baby, couldn't dress himself. An herb doctor settled at Green Grove and used herbs for tea and poultices and cured him. The doctors and the law run him out of there. His name was Hopkins from Popular Bluff, Missouri.

Charlie Vaden used to have rheumatism and he carried a buckeye in each pants pocket to make the rheumatism lighter. He thought it did some good.

He has a birthmark. Said his mother must have craved pig tails. He never had enough pig tails to eat in his life. The butchers give them to him when he comes to Hazen or Des Arc. He said he would "fight a circle saw for a pig tail."

Previous Page of 80Next Page

Comments & Reviews

Login or Facebook Sign in with Twitter
library_icon_grey.png Add share_icon_grey.png Share

Who's Reading

Recommended