House Hippos

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Many have heard of the domesticated house hippo; many have not. The house hippo is an uncommon sighting in our homes, both in rural and urban areas. You've probably never seen it, because you are unattentive and are sitting at your computer all day, reading stories on Wattpad.

The house hippo is just another species of the hippo, coming from the Hippopotamidae family and sharing most characteristics of your everyday zoo hippopotamus. 

The house hippo feeds on potato chips, raisins, candies and the crumbs from peanut butter sandwiches. If none of the listed items are available, the house hippo will resort to eating other foods, such as fresh vegetables, crackers, cheeses, etc... but the house hippo does not consume any meats as most meats will cause their their intestines to inflammate and will eventually cause death.

The average lifespan of the average hippo ranges from 26 years to 34 years but in rare cases, the house hippo can live for up to 50 years. The house hippo cannot survive in the wild as it cannot obtain foods that it has adapted to eat, such as the foods listed in the above paragraph.

The house hippo makes it's nests in closets and in the corners of our basements as those areas are usually darker and will provide more protection. The nests of the house hippo is made from string, pieces of lint, and any mittens or socks it can find lying around. The house hippo's nest must be very warm as they sleep for around 16 hours a day. For the remaining 8 hours of the day, the house hippo spends it's time scavenging for food scraps, water or objects it can use to build it's nest with.

The house hippo has only a few predators, which include the domestic house cat and the dog. Humans are generally not a threat to house hippos as they often walk past the hippos without even noticing them, probably because of their size. An adult house hippo is generally around three to 5 inches long while a newborn or a child hippo would be maybe 1 and a half inches long. All hippos are normally less than an inch tall, which makes them almost invisible to predators; a key component in how they managed to survive throughout the years.

A house hippo is a strong animal for it's size, but because the hippo is so small, it is almost defenceless to a domesticated dog or cat. For defensive purposes, the house hippo tries to stick to shadowy and darker areas and avoids running in to brightly lit areas where it can be easily seen.

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